Real Financial Advice

We are passionate about providing real financial advice.

Consumers seem more confused than ever about where to find this.  The lines between financial institutions have become blurred.  Banks sell investments.  Investment companies are banks.  Insurance companies think they are investment firms. And what do all these titles mean?  Financial planner…wealth manager… advisor?

Who is who, what is what…we get it.  How do you get real advice?

Consider the following Four Pillars of Real Financial Advice when selecting an Advisor.

PILLAR 1

EDUCATION

Education is the foundation upon which everything else is built.  A four-year college degree from an accredited college in business (BBA) prepares individuals for the complexities of understanding stocks and bonds which is paramount for portfolio management. A major in finance or economics is a plus.

PILLAR 2

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS

Credentials are the key because it indicates a level of education, experience, and training that the advisor has undergone.  At a minimum your advisor should have obtained the CFP® (CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™) designation if they will work with you in a planning capacity.

For tax advice and planning the CPA, (Certified Public Accountants) and EA (Enrolled Agents) are the appropriate tax credentials. 

Licenses are held by individuals that sell financial products.  Rather than a license, seek out a professional that has earned a professional designation. 

PILLAR 3

MEMBERSHIP

The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) is the premier organization for finding professionally credentialed, fee-only advisors and does not permit licensed sales people in the organization.  Any advisor that is a member of NAPFA has already demonstrated financial planning capabilities and has been screened as a fiduciary. Their process is thorough and their standards are high.

PILLAR 4

FULLY DISCLOSED COMPENSATION

The fees you pay your advisor for investment advisory services should be disclosed and transparent rather than buried deep in a product sales prospectus. Investment advisors should send you a monthly or quarterly invoice so you can see the calculation and compare your fees to the fees on your financial statement.